Delatestryl

In males: For hypogonadism, 200 to 400 mg every 4 weeks; androgen therapy is regarded as replacement therapy, being effective only as long as continued; prolonged treatment with chorionic gonadotropin is also recommended. For cryptorchidism, 100 to 200 mg every 4 weeks; chorionic gonadotropin should generally be tried first; use only when no obstructive anatomic lesion exists; if descent has not occurred after 3 or 4 months of therapy, surgical transplantation should be considered. For oligospermia, 100 to 200 mg every 4 to 6 weeks for development and maintenance of testicular tubular function; 200 mg every week for 6 to 12 weeks for suppression of spermatogenesis and rebound stimulation.

Injectable steroids are injected into muscle tissue, not into the veins. They are slowly released from the muscles into the rest of the body, and may be detectable for months after last use. Injectable steroids can be oil-based or water-based. Injectable anabolic steroids which are oil-based have longer half-life than water-based steroids. Both steroid types have much longer half-lives than oral anabolic steroids. And this is proving to be a drawback for injectables as they have high probability of being detected in drug screening since their clearance times tend to be longer than orals. Athletes resolve this problem by using injectable testosterone early in the cycle then switch to orals when approaching the end of the cycle and drug testing is imminent.

Clinical studies of DELATESTRYL did not include sufficient numbers of subjects, aged 65 and older, to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Testosterone replacement is not indicated in geriatric patients who have age-related hypogonadism only (“andropause”), because there is insufficient safety and efficacy information to support such use. Current studies do not assess whether testosterone use increases risks of prostate cancer , prostate hyperplasia , and cardiovascular disease in the geriatric population.

Discontinue if jaundice, abnormal liver function, hypercalcemia, or edema occurs. Monitor liver function, hemoglobin, hematocrit, prostate specific antigen (PSA), cholesterol, bone age (every 6 months for pre-pubertal males). Preexisting cardiac, renal or hepatic disease (discontinue if edema occurs). History of MI or coronary artery disease. May increase risk of prostatic hypertrophy or carcinoma in elderly. Testosterone and/or other anabolic androgenic steroid abuse. Monitor for venous thromboembolism; discontinue if suspected. Inform patients of possible increased risk of MI, stroke. Elderly. Young children. Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Delatestryl

delatestryl

Discontinue if jaundice, abnormal liver function, hypercalcemia, or edema occurs. Monitor liver function, hemoglobin, hematocrit, prostate specific antigen (PSA), cholesterol, bone age (every 6 months for pre-pubertal males). Preexisting cardiac, renal or hepatic disease (discontinue if edema occurs). History of MI or coronary artery disease. May increase risk of prostatic hypertrophy or carcinoma in elderly. Testosterone and/or other anabolic androgenic steroid abuse. Monitor for venous thromboembolism; discontinue if suspected. Inform patients of possible increased risk of MI, stroke. Elderly. Young children. Nursing mothers: not recommended.

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